Business Mentoring Matters

Real Advice from Mentors to Mentorees

Posted on Tue, May, 19, 2015

Tags: mentoring pairs

advice mentors to mentorsRecently I conducted a quarterly session with a group of mentors and the following are key points they wanted me to convey to mentorees at their quarterly session. You may find these helpful to share as well:

  • Be clear on what you need and want – you drive the process
  • Do not leave the mentor in the position where they are trying to figure out or drive your needs
  • Allow yourself to be fully vulnerable to develop and grow
  • Remove titles from your mentor’s position and see them just as they are; there for you as a mentor
  • Leverage the relationship not just during your scheduled meetings – utilize them at any time you need assistance, guidance, advise, feedback, or support
  • Everything does not have to be done in a formal process – informal when needed can be powerful for you
  • The program is not just solely about your development plan – greatest part of the relationship is getting advice/support in other areas like personal issues, case study, peer relationships, work balance, etc.
  • Your engagement in the process will determine what you get out of it

Follow this advice and watch your relationship bloom. Feel free to use this list as part of your mentoring training or check out our mentoring training e-learning courses:

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Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/steven-krohn/

 

 

How to match mentoring pairs from two different areas of an organization

Posted on Thu, May, 14, 2015

Tags: Matching Pairs

mentoring_match_pairRecently I conducted a training session with a new group of pairs.  At the mentor training I had a former mentoree who made the following comment:

"You know when I was first matched with my mentor I couldn't understand why we were matched as she came from a different area of the organization and we didn't seem to have much in common. But as our relationship developed we found we had a lot more in common than we thought and we have a great relationship that still continues today."

I share this with you because I often get comments like these and I also frequently get asked about these types of matches. In many cases we do pair people from the same discipline but not always. Sometimes for purposes of breaking down silo mentality and creating connections throughout the organization, we do the opposite and match from different disciplines. We have a two-fold philosophy as to why we do that:

  1. We believe that it is the quality of the relationship that matters and not so much the content.
  2. We believe that a mentor need not have all the expertise a mentoree is seeking as a mentor should be able to help a mentoree to network and get that expertise.

So if you are a mentor or mentoree who is matched with someone outside your discipline, see it as an opportunity to learn new things and share a different experience.

mentoring matching

Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/graphicgreg/

 

Does Your Company Have a Mentoring Philosophy?

Posted on Wed, May, 06, 2015

Tags: Mentoring Programs

mentoring philosophyAt Management Mentors, we believe that mentoring is about building a trusting, transformational relationship promoting the sharing of personal experience and the transmission of knowledge and insight. The result is a relationship creating a developmental learning environment with opportunities for both mentor and mentoree to stretch beyond his or her boundaries within a safe environment.

Does your organization have a corporate mentoring program? If so, do you know your company's mentoring philosophy? If not, feel free to share this post with your mentoring program manager. This is meant as a starting point. Your company can edit/tweak it as it relates to your company's beliefs.

Mentoring Philosophy

  • Mentoring is about having a transformational relationship not only about gaining skills, knowledge or expertise.  This is what makes mentoring different from coaching and managing.
  • We believe that the role of a mentor is to 'empower' a mentoree by leading the mentoree away from dependence upon the mentor so as to assume full independence and self-confidence. 
  • We believe that technology can aid in mentoring but cannot replace the interpersonal relationship that makes mentoring unique. Online systems can be an important tool, when appropriate, as a means of enhancing the relationship.  Our technology components have been developed based upon this philosophy.
  • We believe that mentoring is the most powerful and effective strategy for professional development within an organization.  We remain committed to this sole enterprise for Management Mentors.  We are one of the few consultants who focus exclusively on mentoring and our brand is the most valuable thing we own.
  • Mentoring to be successful must be adaptable and reflect the specific culture of a company and must be built upon that company’s values and core competencies. We listen to our clients to make certain that the programme is truly “theirs”.
  • Diversity both in a broad and a specific sense informs every mentoring project we engage in. Some of our programmes have focused on specific affinity groups while others have focused more broadly on diversity.  The decision as to which emphasis to make is based upon a client’s needs and readiness to engage in meaningful dialogue around issues of diversity.  We believe that mentoring respects the diversity of each employee and, in doing so, creates a culture that is accepting and mutually beneficial. When this occurs, customers are the ultimate beneficiaries.
  • As entrepreneurs we are constantly seeking to be innovative and leaders in the mentoring field. We are committed to creating standards for mentoring practice in order to bring quality control to the mentoring field. 

 

  pilot mentoring program

Image Credit: Flickr.com

Mentoring Program Success Story: Manufacturing Industry

Posted on Tue, Apr, 14, 2015

Tags: mentoring success

pilot mentoring quote resized 600In order to quantify the purpose of an employee mentoring program, many businesses come to us and ask for solid evidence that mentoring programs actually work. We recently put together a number of case studies outlining mentoring program successes. The following is a short and sweet version of a case study we conducted with our client, Bobrick Washroom Equipment

The Challenge

Bobrick wanted to take its employee development to the next level by investing in emerging leaders who showed potential for long-term growth, engaging with them in meaningful ways, and focusing on their specific development needs. In addition, the company wanted to tap into existing leaders and find a way to help them share their wisdom with others within the organization. 

The Solution

Rene Petrin with his approach and mentoring philosophy aligned with Bobricks' vision for their mentoring program. Management Mentors' many resources (such as free white papers) available on the company’s website, and of course, MentoringComplete, the signature software from Management Mentors helped to seal the deal.

The Results

The program lasted nine months and had seven pairs. Mentorees were hesitant about the mentors they were matched with at first, but they quickly discovered the benefits to the carefully made matches. “Many of the mentors and mentorees had different perspectives on what the program would be like, and they found that the specific structure and goals of the program helped them discover what a true mentoring relationship should look like.”


To read even more details about this mentoring success story, go to our case study page and click on the Bobrick case study. 

pilot mentoring program


Best Mentoring Blog Posts: 1st Quarter 2015

Posted on Fri, Apr, 10, 2015

Tags: mentoring

best mentoring blogSpring is in the air. I can smell it! The birds are chirping, the snow is (finally) melting. Even us hardy New Englanders are ready for the next season.

But before we move on, we'd like to share with you our top 3 best mentoring blog posts from the 1st quarter of 2015....aka the snowmageddon. These are the posts that have had the most views and the most interaction with our blog subscribers. Go ahead, check them out!

 

 

Need Better Leadership Skills? Get a Mentor!

How Your Hiring Manager Should Talk Up The Company Mentoring Program

How Mentorship Programs Have Changed Over 25 Years

 

 

corporate mentoring training

 Image Credit: flickr.com/photos/garyboggled/

How Business Mentoring Aids Succession Planning

Posted on Wed, Apr, 08, 2015

Tags: succession planning

Succession Planning resized 600Succession planning helps prepare people to step into new roles when their colleagues leave, retire, or move on to other areas of the organization. This makes for a smoother transition for everyone.

But how does mentoring fit in? Should it even figure into the equation? The answer is YES. An effective mentoring program can enrich your succession planning process.

In our recent newsletter, How Mentoring Fits in With a Succession Planning Process, we discuss in detail 6 ways that mentoring and succession planning work together. The following is a sneak peek of the article. Check out the full article here for even more detail.

  1. Mentoring promotes the transfer of knowledge
  2. Mentoring fosters leadership
  3. Mentoring can be a great way for outgoing employees to wrap up their careers. 
  4. Mentoring can provide peace of mind for other people within the organization. 
  5. Mentoring can help reduce turnover. 
  6. Mentoring continues to work long after the succession planning process is over. 

Can you think of anything to add to this list? Has your organization used mentoring as a succession planning aid?

 

leadership and mentoring

Mentoring Program Success Story: Healthcare Industry

Posted on Tue, Mar, 31, 2015

Tags: mentoring success


mentoring program successIn order to quantify the purpose of an employee mentoring program, many businesses come to us and ask for solid evidence that mentoring programs actually work. We recently put together a number of case studies outlining mentoring program successes. The following is a short and sweet version of a case study we conducted with our client, KentucyOne Health, a non-profit healthcare system.

Note: Success baby does not represent either KentuckyOne Health or Management Mentors, but COME ON! Who doesn't feel like him every once in a while? This is how we want you to feel when your mentoring program is a great success!

 

The Challenge

The company faced challenges that are common to newly formed organizations: finding effective ways to develop and grow its employees. 

The Solution

The purpose of the program is to support the professional development of new leaders as well as support the purpose and values of the organization.

How Mentoring Software Fits In

Mentors and mentorees are spread out across an entire state. The Mentoring Program Manager didn't personally know many of them and they didn't know each other. The ability to use the matching algorithm in MentoringComplete was extremely helpful in making effective matches.

The Results

So far, one program has been completed, and two others are underway. The overall feedback from participants has been positive and the Mentoring Program Manager is eager to see the program evolve and grow along with the organization. 

 

To read even more details about this mentoring success story, go to our case study page and click on the KentuckyOne Health case study. And to comment on either the case studies or Success Baby, please do so below!


Image Credit: Mike Kincaid | Flickr.com

corporate mentoring certification  

SlideShare: 9 Mentoring Program Best Practices

Posted on Thu, Mar, 26, 2015

Tags: Best Practices in Mentoring

mentoring program best practicesAny company that is incorporating a mentoring program should follow best practices. Whether you are designing your program or you already have a mentoring program in place, be sure to check out our SlideShare: 9 Mentoring Program Best Practices to ensure you are offering your mentoring program participants the absolute best chance at a successful mentoring relationship.

First 3 of 9 Mentoring Best Practices:

1. Identify a strategic purpose

2. Train a program manager

3. Differentiate between coaching and mentoring.

To learn more about these best practices and to get the next six, download our SlideShare Presentation: 9 Mentoring Program Best Practices. 

P.S. In it's first two weeks on SlideShare, our best practices in mentoring presentation was viewed over 4,000 times and downloaded more than 350 times!

Mentoring Program Managers: Conduct quarterly check-in meetings

Posted on Tue, Mar, 24, 2015

Tags: Mentoring Program Manager

One of the activities we conduct when working with a Mentoring Program Manager (MPM) is to have quarterly meetings with the mentoring pairs.

 mentoring program manager

General structure for a quarterly check-in meeting between mentoring program managers and mentoring participants

Conduct a one-hour session with the mentors and a separate one-hour session with the mentorees

1. State the purpose of the meeting

o   Feedback on how the relationship is working
o   Share one objective working on
o   General feedback

2. State the ground rules of the meeting

o   It's a confidential meeting so what we say here stays here
o   If I ask a question that you are not comfortable answering, then just ask me to pass to the next person
o   At the end of the quarterly meetings, we will provide a summary of comments from both groups but will not identify anyone

3. The meeting begins

Begin the meeting by telling participants that you would like to hear from everyone and go around the room and ask for answers to the following questions:

o  Who is your partner?
o  How often are you meeting and, on average, how long do you meet for?
o  What is the one objective you can share that you're working on and how is that going?
o  How is the relationship working for you at this time?

4. Once every participant has reported in...

o  Ask follow-up questions based upon the feedback received
o  Provide suggestions on any areas needing attention

5. Ending the meeting

o  Thank everyone for their feedback
o  Remind them of the next meeting date
o  Remind them that they will get a summary as indicated earlier

The feedback you receive at such meetings allows the MPM to have a greater sense of what's working and what's not and also see if there are common themes. It also allows peers to mentor and assist each other in their respective role as either mentor or mentoree.

We hope that you will find this agenda for quarertly check-in meetings for Mentoring Program Managers useful. You may also be interested in learning more about our Mentoring Certification. Click the buttons below for more information:

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Mentoring Program Managers: Conduct a quarterly check-in meeting with participants

Posted on Tue, Mar, 24, 2015

Tags: Mentoring Program Manager

mentoring program managerOne of the activities we conduct when working with a Mentoring Program Manager (MPM) is to have quarterly meetings with the mentoring pairs.  

General structure for a quarterly check-in meeting between mentoring program managers and mentoring participants

Conduct a one-hour session with the mentors and a separate one-hour session with the mentorees

1. State the meeting's purpose

o   Feedback on how the relationship is working
o   Share one objective working on
o   General feedback

2. State the ground rules of the meeting

o   It's a confidential meeting so what we say here stays here
o   If I ask a question that you are not comfortable answering, then just ask me to pass to the next person
o   At the end of the quarterly meetings, we will provide a summary of comments from both groups but will not identify anyone

3. The meeting begins

Begin the meeting by telling participants that you would like to hear from everyone and go around the room and ask for answers to the following questions:

o  Who is your partner?
o  How often are you meeting and, on average, how long do you meet for?
o  What is the one objective you can share that you're working on and how is that going?
o  How is the relationship working for you at this time?

After everyone has reported in, ask follow-up questions based upon the feedback received and provide suggestions on any areas needing  attention.

End the meeting by thanking everyone for their feedback and reminding them of the next meeting date and that they will get a summary as indicated earlier.

The feedback you receive at such meetings allows the MPM to have a greater sense of what's working and what's not and also see if there are common themes. It also allows peers to mentor and assist each other in their respective role as either mentor or mentoree.

 

mentoring program manager, mentoring program managers